Skip to main content

Posts

SAFAR: Simulated Annealing-based Optimal Flow Allocation in Industrial Networks

Given a network (a set of nodes) and a set of traffic flows, a network flow allocation assigns network paths to these flows, so that data (for example, packets) can be sent from the respective source nodes to the corresponding destination nodes. In case of optimal network flow allocation, certain criteria, such as latency and utilization, need to be optimized. Moreover, in case of integral network flow allocation, all packets from a source node to a given destination node either travel via a single path or none at all. In other words, such a flow cannot be “split” across multiple paths. Optimal network flow allocation is a computationally hard problem, which not only requires a long time to solve, but also high level of skills. The problem becomes further challenging when unique business and industrial requirements are considered. In our recent work, we investigated this problem in the context of power grid networks, where the flows often require delay-symmetric upstream an
Recent posts

ACM FICN 2018: Call for Papers

The 1 st ACM International Workshop on Future Industrial Communication Networks  (FICN) will be held in conjunction with ACM MobiCom 2018 at New Delhi, India. The tentative date of the workshop is either 29 October or 02 November, 2018 (to be confirmed very soon) . ACM FICN seeks original, novel, and previously unpublished (and currently not under consideration anywhere else) papers that address the challenges faced by modern industrial networks. Submitted papers will be peer-reviewed by the members of the Technical Program Committee where technical merit, novelty, timeliness, and relevance to the workshop shall be taken into consideration. Topics of interest to ACM FICN include, but are not limited to: Autonomous and intelligent intent-based networks Critical communication network and systems Industry 4.0 communication systems and related standards Green communication and battery-saving systems Large-scale sensor networks and industrial IoT (IIoT) applications 5G

The ONE KB has a new home

The ONE Knowledge Base is now hosted at http://theonekb.pythonanywhere.com/ If you are unaware, the ONE KB allows you to search the old email archives of the simulator's community. Therefore, if you have any question related to simulation, you may query the existing database at the above link. Chances are good that your question might already have been answered previously. If not, you can still post an email to the community's mailing list. Have you tried the ONE KB already? How was your experience? Was it helpful? Let me know in the comments!

SeeR: Simulated Annealing-based Routing in Opportunistic Mobile Networks

Conceptual architecture of SeeR Opportunistic Mobile Networks (OMNs) are characterized by intermittent connectivity among nodes. In many scenarios, the nodes attempt at local decision making based on greedy approaches, which can result in getting trapped at local optimum. Moreover, for efficient routing, the nodes often collect and exchange lot of information about others. To alleviate such issues, we present SeeR, a simulated annealing-based routing protocol for OMNs. In SeeR, each message is associated with a cost function, which is evaluated by considering its current hop-count and the average aggregated inter-contact time of the node. A node replicates a message to another node, when the latter offers a lower cost. Otherwise, the message is replicated with decreasing probability. Moreover, SeeR works based solely upon local observations. In particular, a node does not track information about other nodes, and, therefore, reduces the risk of privacy leaks unlike m

Text Highlighting in Latex

While preparing a manuscript with Latex, it is often useful to highlight the changes made in the current revision with a different color. This can be achieved using the \ textcolor command provided by Latex. For example, \textcolor {red}{Hello World} would display the string "Hello World" in red color. However, the final/published copy of the manuscript does not contain any highlighted text. Therefore, if a large volume of changes were made, it becomes tiresome at the end to find and remove all the individual portions of highlighted text. This can be circumvented by defining a utility command to switch highlighting on and off as desired. In the following, we define a new Latex command, highlighttext , for this purpose. The command takes only a single argument—the text to be highlighted.     \usepackage {color}    % For highlighting changes in this version with red color   \newcommand { \highlighttext }[1] { \textcolor {red}{#1}}   % Remove all text highlighting

Welcome, 2017!

Dear Readers and Followers, Wish you and your family a very happy and prosperous New Year! May this new year dawns with the promises of a brighter tomorrow. #HNY2017

Happy New Year

A very happy and prosperous new year to you all! Hope you had a great year in 2015, and wish you have a still better one in 2016! May you do excellent research in this year, and may your citations increase manifold :D